Marcos A. Rodriguez

Marcos A. Rodriguez (born 22 July 1958)[1] is a Cuban-Americanentrepreneur, movie producer, businessperson and investor.[2][3] He is the founder and CEO of numerous American media outlets including KLTY, KUUR, an FM radio station serving the Carbondale, Colorado area and “TV Aspen” KCXP-LP, a television station in Aspen, Colorado.[4] These radio and television stations represent the only locally owned stations in Aspen.[2]

Marcos A. Rodriguez

Marcos A. Rodriguez – Cuban-American business-man, CEO of Colorado Marketing LLC
Born (1958-07-22) July 22, 1958 (age 63)

Nationality Cuban-American
Occupation Radio broadcaster, entrepreneur, movie producer, businessperson and investor
Known for Radio broadcasting, movie producer

. . . Marcos A. Rodriguez . . .

Rodriguez was born in Cuba, shortly before Fidel Castro‘s revolution successfully ousted Batista at the start of 1959. Rodriguez’s father, Marcos Rodriguez Sr., who was 34 at the time, was director and salesman for CMKF, a local radio station[2] in the city of Holguín in the Oriente province.[5] As Castro’s revolutionary reforms resulted in the nationalizing of radio stations,[2][6] the radio station’s format, like others in Castro’s Cuba, was changed, becoming a source for disseminating propaganda for the revolutionary movement.[5] Rodriguez Sr. was demoted from his previous positions to become an announcer and was required to read propaganda over the airwaves, a situation to which he objected.[5]

Dissatisfied, Rodriguez Sr. was eventually allowed to leave Cuba with his family in August 1962, moving to Miami.[6] He held various odd jobs[5] while his wife, Gisela Rodriguez,[7] who had been a qualified pharmacist in Cuba, had difficulties finding a job as her Cuban qualifications were not easily accepted in the United States. She was finally offered a job about a year later at a pharmacy in Shreveport, Louisiana, and the family moved there. Rodriguez Sr. gained a position in broadcasting as a floor man for KTBS-TV, a Shreveport television station. Within a year, he was promoted to cameraman.[5]

In 1964, Rodriguez Sr. moved to Texas with his family after being offered a position to work at 1540 AM (then called KCUL), a country and western station in Fort Worth. He was responsible for the station’s venture to start an all-Spanish format on the new sister station on 93.9FM (then called KBUY), the first radio station with this format in North Texas.[8] Rodriguez Sr. continued to pursue radio broadcasting in Texas[5] and in 1975 he purchased the station for which he previously worked and changed its call letters to KESS (that frequency is now called KLNO),[7] becoming the first Hispanic owner of an all-Spanish radio station in Texas.[7]

Rodriguez Sr.’s two sons, Marcos and Tony Rodriguez also developed an interest in broadcasting.[7] Rodriguez acquired KLTY on 94.1 FM in Fort Worth, KSSA on 1600 AM in Dallas and KLAT, an AM station in Houston which was later sold to Tichenor Media System.

On 15 February 1992, Rodriguez Sr. died of a heart attack at the age of 65.[7] His son, Marcos A. Rodriguez took over his father’s station[6] and pursued additional media ventures. Over a thirteen-year period, Rodriguez owned and programmed many stations in Texas,[4] founding and/or operating the stations KLTY, KESS-FM, KICK, KMRT, KTCY and TV31, under the Dallas radio group during the 1980s and 1990s.[9] In addition to the radio stations, Rodriguez owns a real estate brokerage firm, Aspen Real Estate Company,[4] as well as TV Aspen (Channel 19) in Aspen, Colorado,[2] where he resides with his family.

. . . Marcos A. Rodriguez . . .

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. . . Marcos A. Rodriguez . . .