Adawro River

Adawro is a torrent of the Nile basin. Rising on the Ts’ats’en plateau of Dogu’a Tembien in northern Ethiopia, it flows northward to empty finally in Giba and Tekezé River.[1]

River in the Tembien highlands of Ethiopia

Adawro River

The Adawro River at Ksad Adawro

Adawro River in Dogu’a Tembien
Etymology After the homonymous village
Location
Country Ethiopia
Region Tigray Region
District (woreda) Dogu’a Tembien
Physical characteristics
Source Ts’ats’en Plateau
  location Adawro in Lim’at municipality
  elevation 2,625 m (8,612 ft)
Mouth Zelekwa or upper Tanqwa River
  location
Ksad Adawro in Lim’at municipality
  coordinates

13.633°N 39.149°E / 13.633; 39.149

  elevation
2,415 m (7,923 ft)
Length 1.8 km (1.1 mi)
Width  
  average 7 m (23 ft)
Basin features
River system Seasonal river
Landmarks Basalt cliffs with eucalypts
Bridges On main road Mek’eleAbiy Addi
Topography Mountains and gorges

. . . Adawro River . . .

It is a confined bedrock river, with an average slope gradient of 117 metres per kilometre. The river has cut a gorge in the surrounding basalt.[2]

Adawro River

Runoff mostly happens in the form of high runoff discharge events that occur in a very short period (called flash floods). These are related to the steep topography, often little vegetation cover and intense convective rainfall. The peaks of such flash floods have often a 50 to 100 times larger discharge than the preceding baseflow.[2] The magnitude of floods in this river has however been decreased due to interventions in the catchment, including the establishment of the Adawro exclosure on the upper slopes of the catchment. Physical conservation structures such as stone bunds[3][4] and check dams also intercept runoff.[5][6]

Log dam in Adawro river
Log dam building in Adawro

Observing that, in rivers with coarse bedload, gabioncheck dams were destroyed by abrasion, boulder-faced log dams were installed transversally across this torrent. They were embedded in the banks of torrent, 0.5–1 m above the bed, and their upstream sides were faced with large rocks. Such dams lead to temporary water ponding, spreading of peak flow over the entire channel width, and sediment deposition. After testing under extreme flow conditions (including two heavy storms) it appeared that 60% of the dams resisted strong floods, particularly in the upper segment of the river. Neighbouring farmers appreciate such structures to control first-order torrents with coarse bed load because the technique is cheap and can be easily installed.[7]

Adawro river bed

. . . Adawro River . . .

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. . . Adawro River . . .