St. James Priory, Derby

St. James Priory, also known as Derby Cluniac Priory, was a Benedictine monastery, formerly located in what is now Derby City Centre. It existed until the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

St James’ Priory, Derby
Derby Cluniac Priory

Coat of Arms of Cluny Abbey

Location within Derbyshire
Monastery information
Full name St James’ Priory, Derby
Other names Prioratus Sancti Jacobi de Derby de Aldenna[1]
Order Benedictine: Cluniac order
Established Between 1072-1076
Disestablished 1536
Mother house Bermondsey Abbey
Cluny Abbey
Dedicated to St James[2]
Diocese Diocese of Lichfield
People
Founder(s) Waltheof, Earl of Northumbria
Site
Location St James’s Street (formerly St James’s Lane), Derby
Coordinates

52°55′20″N1°28′42″W

Grid reference SK 3517 3624
Visible remains None

. . . St. James Priory, Derby . . .

A representation of a Benedictine Monk

The priory stood on the north side of St James’s Street, formerly known as St James’s Lane, adjacent to the Markeaton Brook.[3][4]

There had been a chapel dedicated to St James on the site from the Saxon era.[3] Between 1072 and 1076, Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumbria gave the chapel to the Benedictine monks of Bermondsey Abbey, who quickly developed it into a priory.[5] The donation of the chapel was confirmed by King Stephen around 1140.[5]

The Corporation of Derby (a forerunner of Derby City Council) paid the priory two pounds of wax each year for the right of the citizens of Derby to cross St James Bridge, constructed by the monks.[3][1]

. . . St. James Priory, Derby . . .

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. . . St. James Priory, Derby . . .