Fran O’Hanlon

Francis Brian O’Hanlon (born August 24, 1948) is an American college basketball coach and the current head men’s basketball coach at Lafayette College.[1] Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, O’Hanlon played college basketball at Villanova University, from where he graduated in 1970. O ‘Hanlon played in an infamous 1970 NCAA Tournament basketball game against Saint Bonaventure, when Bob Lanier was tripped up and injured in a collision with Chris Ford. He played professional basketball for the Miami Floridians of the ABA in the 1970–71 season[2] despite being a Philadelphia 76ers draft pick in the 8th round of the 1970 NBA draft. From 1975 to 1982, O’Hanlon played overseas with Hageby Basket in Sweden.[3]

American basketball player and coach
Fran O’Hanlon
Lafayette Leopards
Position Head coach
League Patriot League
Personal information
Born (1948-08-24) August 24, 1948 (age 73)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Listed weight 175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High school St. Thomas More
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
College Villanova (1967–1970)
NBA draft 1970 / Round: 8 / Pick: 131st overall
Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
Playing career 1970–1982
Position Guard
Number 10
Coaching career 1982–present
Career history
As player:
1970–1971 Miami Floridians
1975–1982 Hageby BK
As coach:
1982–1983 Panteras de Lara
1983–1984 Hapoel Haifa
1984–1985 Temple (women’s asst.)
1985–1986 Maccabi Haifa
1986–1989 Monsignor Bonner HS
1989–1995 Penn (assistant)
1995–present Lafayette
Career highlights and awards
As Player:

  • Swedish Basketball League champion (1980)

As Coach:

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

O’Hanlon was appointed to succeed John Leone as the 21st head coach in Lafayette Leopards men’s basketball history on March 13, 1995.[4]

. . . Fran O’Hanlon . . .

Statistics overview
Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Lafayette Leopards(Patriot League)(1995–present)
1995–96 Lafayette 7–20 4–8 5th
1996–97 Lafayette 11–17 5–7 T–4th
1997–98 Lafayette 19–9 10–2 T–1st
1998–99 Lafayette 22–8 10–2 1st NCAA Round of 64
1999–2000 Lafayette 24–7 11–1 T–1st NCAA Round of 64
2000–01 Lafayette 12–16 4–8 T–5th
2001–02 Lafayette 15–14 8–6 T–3rd
2002–03 Lafayette 13–16 6–8 6th
2003–04 Lafayette 18–10 9–5 T–3rd
2004–05 Lafayette 10–18 6–8 T–5th
2005–06 Lafayette 11–17 5–9 5th
2006–07 Lafayette 9–21 3–11 8th
2007–08 Lafayette 15–15 6–8 T–5th
2008–09 Lafayette 8–22 4–10 T–7th
2009–10 Lafayette 19–13 8–6 3rd
2010–11 Lafayette 13–19 6–8 T-4th
2011–12 Lafayette 13–17 7–7 5th
2012–13 Lafayette 19–15 10–4 T–2nd
2013–14 Lafayette 11–20 6–12 7th
2014–15 Lafayette 20–13 9–9 T–4th NCAA Round of 64
2015–16 Lafayette 6–24 3–15 10th
2016–17 Lafayette 9–21 5–13 T–9th
2017–18 Lafayette 10–21 7–11 7th
2018–19 Lafayette 10–20 7–11 T–7th
2019–20 Lafayette 19–12 10–8 T–4th
2020–21 Lafayette 9–6 9–5 1st (Central)
Lafayette: 351–413 (.459) 178–202 (.468)
Total: 351–413 (.459)

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

. . . Fran O’Hanlon . . .

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. . . Fran O’Hanlon . . .