Afri-Cola

Afri-Cola is a colasoft drink produced in Germany. The trademark Afri-Cola was registered in 1931 by the company F. Blumhoffer Nachfolger GmbH. The same company also produced Bluna, an orange soft drink. Today the brand belongs to the Mineralbrunnen Überkingen-Teinach AG. Afri-Cola was once one of the most popular cola brands in Germany, but has lost considerable market share since the 1960s.[1]

“Africola” redirects here. For the genus of mites, see Diarthrophallidae.

Afri-Cola

1 liter plastic Afri-Cola bottle, alongside a 0.2 liter bar glass
Type Cola
Manufacturer Mineralbrunnen Überkingen-Teinach AG
Country of origin Germany
Introduced 1931; 90 years ago (1931)
Related products Bluna
Website www.afri-cola.de 
Afri-Cola

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Afri-Cola was registered in 1931 by F. Blumhoffer Nachfolger GmbH, a company founded in 1864 and based in Cologne. After the Second World War, Afri-Cola became one of the most popular drinks in Germany and a symbol of the German Wirtschaftswunder. In 1952, the company launched Bluna, an orange soft drink similar to Fanta, which also became a hit among customers. However, in the hard competition of the 1960s, Afri-Cola started to lose its influence on the German market to Coca-Cola and Pepsi.[2] To update its image, the company hired designer and photographer Charles Wilp who created a controversial and attention-grabbing marketing campaign which positioned the brand at the cutting edge.

The market share of Afri-Cola continued to dwindle during the 1980s and 1990s. Eventually, in 1998, German beverage company Mineralbrunnen Überkingen-TeinachAG bought all rights to Afri-Cola and Bluna. This company changed the recipe of Afri-Cola in 1998. The taste of the 1998 drink also differed from that of the original. Also, until 1998 the caffeine content was 250 mg/L, which is higher than the average.[3] At the re-release, it had a content below 150 mg/L so that the content does not need to be listed on the bottle.[4]

However, as with Coca-Cola’s New Coke, the new recipe was unpopular. The mixture was again changed to taste more like the original one, the caffeine content was increased in 2005 to around 200 mg/L and caffeine was again listed as an ingredient on the label.[5] This mixture was also not sufficiently successful and on April 1, 2006, the company finally changed back to the original recipe, with caffeine content of 250 mg/L.

Since then, Afri-Cola has slightly regained market share.

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