Kenny Williams (baseball)

Kenneth Royal Williams (born April 6, 1964) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball and the current Executive Vice President of the Chicago White Sox.

American baseball player and executive
Kenny Williams
Outfielder
Born: (1964-04-06) April 6, 1964 (age 57)
Berkeley, California
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 2, 1986, for the Chicago White Sox
Last MLB appearance
October 4, 1991, for the Montreal Expos
MLB statistics
Batting average .218
Home runs 27
Runs batted in 119
Teams
As player

As general manager

Career highlights and awards

. . . Kenny Williams (baseball) . . .

Selected by the White Sox in the third round of the 1982 amateur draft, Williams made his debut in 1986 and spent three years in Chicago, primarily as a center fielder, before being traded to the Detroit Tigers in 1989. The Tigers waived him during the 1990 season, and he was claimed by the Toronto Blue Jays. Williams remained a bit player with the Blue Jays, usually coming on as a pinch-runner due to his speed. He was the starting center fielder when Dave Stieb threw his only no-hitter, the first no-hitter in Toronto history. He is best remembered as a player for a bizarre incident during the 1990 season, where a series of wild throwing errors resulted in him (on base as a pinch-runner) rounding third base and mauling over third base coach John McLaren, knocking him out in the process (Williams himself was winded, but eventually ended up scoring the run). This humorous clip would be played over and over in blooper reels for years to come. The Blue Jays then put him on waivers during the 1991 season, with Canada’s other major league team, the Montreal Expos, picking him up. Williams decided to retire from baseball after being released by Montreal following the 1991 season.

In November 1992, Williams rejoined the White Sox organization as a scout. Named special assistant to Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf in 1994, he spent some time as a studio analyst for Sox games on SportsChannel Chicago before becoming the team’s director of minor league operations in 1995. In 1997, he was named vice-president of player development, a position in which he remained until 2000.

. . . Kenny Williams (baseball) . . .

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. . . Kenny Williams (baseball) . . .