Su Yugui

Su Yugui (蘇禹珪) (895[1]–February 15, 956[1][2]), courtesy nameYuanxi (元錫), formally the Duke of Ju (莒國公), was an official during the ChineseFive Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period states Later Jin, Later Han, and Later Zhou, serving as a chancellor during Later Han and Later Zhou.

. . . Su Yugui . . .

Su Yugui was born in 895, during the reign of Emperor Zhaozong of Tang. His ancestors were said to be from Wugong (武功, in modern Xianyang, Shaanxi), but for several generations had lived in Gaomi (高密, in modern Weifang, Shandong). His father Su Zhongrong (蘇仲榮) was known for being well-learned in Confucianism in their home territory. At one point, Su Zhongrong passed the imperial examination in the Mingjing (明經) class, and was made an assistant professor at the imperial university; he later served as the magistrate of Futang County (輔唐, in modern Weifang).[1]

Su Yugui himself was said to be humble and peaceful, taking after his father in studies. He, like his father, passed the Mingjing examinations, and was thereafter made a staff member of the prefect of Liao Prefecture (遼州, in modern Jinzhong, Shanxi). (It is unclear when this occurred, but it must have occurred after the fall of Tang’s successor state Later Liang, as during Later Liang, Liao Prefecture belonged to Later Liang’s rival Jin; it thus occurred either during Later Tang or Later Jin.) He later served successively as secretary to the military governors (Jiedushi) of Pinglu (平盧, headquartered in modern Weifang) and Tianping (天平, headquartered in modern Tai’an, Shandong) Circuits, and then as the treasurers of Zhaoyi (昭義, headquartered in modern Changzhi, Shanxi) and Hedong (河東, headquartered in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi) Circuits.[1] After the major Later Jin general Liu Zhiyuan was made the military governor of Hedong in 941,[3] he made Su his assistant in his role as governor (觀察使, Guanchashi) of Hedong.[1][4]

In 947, Later Jin was destroyed by its northern neighbor Liao (Khitan), and Liao’s Emperor Taizong claimed to be the emperor of China as well. Liu Zhiyuan initially postured as if he were going to submit to Liao, but soon declared himself emperor (of an initially unnamed state, but later known as Later Han). He made Su Yugui and another assistant, Su Fengji, chancellors, both with the titles of Zhongshu Shilang (中書侍郎) and Tong Zhongshu Menxia Pingzhangshi (同中書門下平章事).[4] After Liu was subsequently able to take over the Central Plains, Su Yugui received the additional title of minister of justice (刑部尚書, Xingbu Shangshu).[1] As Liao’s Emperor Taizong had taken the Later Jin chancellors Feng Dao and Li Song north, Liu awarded Feng’s mansion to Su Yugui and Li’s mansion to Su Fengji.[5] It was said that Su Fengji and Su Yugui were deeply trusted by the emperor, such that no one could alienate him from them; he entrusted them with all governmental matters, while entrusting all military matters to Yang Bin and Guo Wei. At Su Fengji’s recommendations, Liu made Li Tao, as well as Dou Zhengu, chancellors as well, joining the Sus, in fall 947, as he was set to join the generals Gao Xingzhou and Murong Yanchao (Liu’s half-brother) against the rebellious general Du Chongwei. At that time, Su Yugui received the title of You Pushe (右僕射).[6]

. . . Su Yugui . . .

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. . . Su Yugui . . .